Treatment with Procedures

Treatment with Procedures


Is AFib Curable? Which Treatments Are Most Effective?


We don’t usually say AFib is “curable” but we do know that there are treatable causes and options for decreasing the burden from AFib that can –but may not always– keep the AFib from returning.

The Usual First Steps: While medications and electrical cardioversion are common treatment options for atrial fibrillation treatment, they don't cure AFib. However, there are some procedures that can help people achieve long-term success.

What’s Next? What are the most common treatment options to consider after medication and electrical cardioversion have been tried?


There are two major approaches to consider if medications aren't working or are failing to help you achieve normal sinus rhythm. Catheter ablation and surgical maze procedures can stop the atrial fibrillation and relieve symptoms for many patients.

Follow the links below to learn about AFib treatment goals and options as well as catheter ablation and surgery, including what to expect and the risks and success rates of each.

AFib Treatment: What Is Normal Sinus Rhythm?


And what is the definition of being “cured” of atrial fibrillation? Learn more about the goals and areas of the heart that may be the target of these treatment options.

Using Electrical Cardioversion For Atrial Fibrillation


When AFib isn’t stopping on its own, you may be encouraged to try electrical cardioversion early in the process to stop the AFib and put the heart back into normal sinus rhythm.

Treating Atrial Fibrillation with Catheter Ablation


In an ablation, a catheter-based energy source is inserted through the groin, neck, or arm and threaded to the heart, where it scars the tissue to block erratic signals from controlling the heart. Catheter ablation is more invasive than cardioversion but less invasive than surgery.

Treating Atrial Fibrillation with AV Node Ablation?


Learn more about what AV node ablation is, some important considerations prior to having this procedure, and who may be a candidate.

Treating Atrial Fibrillation with Surgery


Surgical procedures may be considered for people whose AFib does not respond to less invasive measures. These three surgical procedures vary in their degree of complexity and downtime required for the patient.

What should I know about the most recent developments in AFib treatment?


Having both the electrophysiologist and the surgeon collaborate in the operating suite has led to the latest surgical trend, the hybrid ablation procedure. It incorporates both catheter ablation and a mini maze procedure in a single operation. It is important to explore each type of atrial fibrillation with your doctor to determine the best treatment options for you.

Recent Discussions From The Providers Office Forum
Spencer avatar

OK.  Now, I didn't do it not to say that I didn't think it... but my cardiac doc broke his should.  Remember this doc - yelled at me when asking about other options, performed a cardioversion on me after I told him that I didn't approve one, and cooed about how intelligent and talented he was after my last ablation and then I had a heart attack 3 days later.  Well - he is out.  My ablation was moved from 4 Apr to 5 Apr and I have a new doc.  But, I will not be allowed to meet with this doc until I am on the OR table. I tried to get some info but since this is all military, there is zero records online.  The doc could have multiple malpractice claims against him, or have terrible success with ablations.  I don't know.  I only know that he is a doc and that is about it.  

So I will be operated on for cardiac surgery by someone that I don't know and won't meet until the moment before I am put under.  I have gotten worse from every single operation in this clinic and my symtpoms have gone from annoyance to debilitating and life threathening.  I can't back out as my VA benefits could be denied because I am not doing what is being perscribed.  So I's @@#$@ again.  Par for the course.

Spencer

Waiting for my Sunrise

Blkat131 avatar

Hello all,


I was recently diagnosed with afib/rvr, and my doctor ordered a pocket ecg for one month. I am not taking any drugs for this condition, as I could not tolerate them, not because I didn't want to. Anyhow the cardiologist office just called and gave me an appointment on Tuesday due to an alert they received overnight from my monitor, but did not tell me what it was specifically. Does anyone here have experience with these monitors or know why an alert would be generated?  I had a short spike in hr up to about 130 which quickly resolved, and later woke in the middle of the night with my heart thumping like crazy, not high rate but very irregular. Now of course Im even more anxious than I was, waiting for a call back from a nurse. Thanks for any insights.

 

cowlady1 avatar

I am interested in knowing how many of you are seeing an EP rather than a cardiologist...I have been in SNR since my diagnosis in early November.  Cardiologist never put me on a monitor and I found him to be dismissive and distracted.  If episodes were caused by holiday heart syndrome (which are his thoughts) does this mean I will be on drugs forever? 

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