Mellanie at StopAfib.org

Helpful Tip

Hello! If you are wanting to ask this member a question directly, or leave a nice comment about them, you are in the right place! If you have a question that might benefit the entire community, we recommend that you post it in the forum so that others can comment and learn from your experience. You might be surprised how many people respond with a "I've been there" or "I can relate"! 

Take me to the AFib Forum

Leave a comment

Log in to post a comment.

Did I have a heart attack?  Ok on 31 Dec, I was taken away in an ambulence.  The ER doc said heart attack... a "slow moving heart attack", now I have no idea what that is.  But the initial blood work that came back as I was told was 0.02 for troponin.  They did blood work two hours later and it was 0.06.  Head ER doc said, Heart Attack.  When they transfered me to the military hospital they did blood work every 4 hours... 0.06 and steady the whole time (upto 3 days later)  The cardiac intern that first say me said heart attack also - I've talked with her a few times and she seems to be pretty good and diligent.  Three days later when they released me - they all said no heart attack but some sort of "cardiac event" associated with the ablation just three days earlier.  Now, I have pulled all the records that I could and there is no blood test on record that show the increase.  My first blood test seems to be gone or not recorded.  So I am unsure.  The evidence that I possess says to me - no.  But two docs have told me yes.  My full cardiac doc, I am sure doesn't want to show that I had a heart attack even if very mild.  But the episode to me felt way way worse than any SVT that I have ever had and I have never passed out while laying down in the ER bed.  So advice?  I think I need to go with the evidence as that is all that I really have outside of a verbal discussion with two docs.
  • Posted Sun 21 Jan 2018 09:08 AM CST
  • Comment

Mellanie - Need some reassurance from someone who has walked this path before... So, I am two weeks out from the ablation.  I am having AFib / SVTs / PVCs nearly daily.  I am typically in AFib 6+ hours each day.  Is this normal for blanking?  My AFib nearly all start right at midnight after I have been sleeping for 2-3 hours.  I get woken up with a pounding heart in my ears and lots of chest pain.

Second, when I convert back to NSR, my BP drops to 90/65 and stays there for several hours.  During AFib, rock solid BP 110/70.  Is this normal?
  • Posted Tue 09 Jan 2018 04:24 PM CST
  • Comment
Spencer,

Sorry, I'm on the road today, so have not been checking the forum. Normally, we request people to share on the forum rather than privately so everyone can benefit from the answers, but I will make an exception this time - but it is just between us. 

No, that is more than one would expect during the blanking period. Typically, the doctors will provide a med to be taken daily or as needed during the blanking period to manage stuff like this. That is why I mentioned that I was surprised they didn't give you a prescription for Tikosyn since they tried it on you in the hospital (IV) and it seemed to work without "QT prolongation.

The other thing is that usually, if sleep apnea is suspected, they will get you tested and on a CPAP before the procedure to make sure that sleep apnea is under control. Untreated sleep apnea, I believe, is the reason you are having so many issues right now. I just cannot understand why they cannot get you your sleep study results and get you a CPAP that appears to be needed. 

I've not heard of the BP dropping like that upon converting, but I guess it is possible that it is completely normal. 

I so wish they would deal with what appears to be sleep apnea, and do something to ease your afib burden during the blanking period.

Mellanie
  • Posted Tue 09 Jan 2018 10:08 PM CST
  • |

Thank you. Will do.

kiet
  • Posted Mon 08 Jan 2018 10:55 AM CST
  • Comment

Hi Mellanie,

i'm 62 a  new female member and glad to Join this site to know other members and learn from  other Afib experiences.

I diagnosed Afib in 2015 and have been on Warfin since then.  I was first on Diltiazem and switched to Atenolol 10mg in 2017 due to side effect, swollen in my leg.  I have asthma as well and feel critical from  catching Flu/Cold.   Quite often I have to go to emergency to receive steam treatment with steroid  and take Prednisone in subsequence.  Because of that, I avoid to travel.  

Recently my Afib keep coming back usually from after eating and anxiety.  How can I find out what kind of Afib I have? 

Regards,
Kiet C

 
  • Posted Mon 08 Jan 2018 10:37 AM CST
  • Comment
Kiet,

Could you please post this to the forum itself as I am not the only one with answers - people on the forum have lots of experience. (Also, I know very little about asthma; many on the forum have it and can provide better answers.) It is preferred that we moderators answer questions for the entire forum rather than privately.

Mellanie
  • Posted Mon 08 Jan 2018 10:41 AM CST
  • |

Mellanie,

​Thank you for the prompt reply!

Mike Collins
  • Posted Sat 06 Jan 2018 02:34 PM CST
  • Comment

Mellanie:
​Great post on 1/6/18 with link to summary of "potential cures" for AFiB: easy to folow; all pertinenet info is there.
I have been looking for this kind of summary for over two years. I am 74.
Any further details on those over 80 who can be  candidates for Mini Maze?
Thank you.

Mike Collins
OUMike 
  • Posted Sat 06 Jan 2018 07:36 AM CST
  • Comment
Mike,

Thanks. It's a recap of what is on our StopAfib.org site. You may want to go through the info at the link I provided (https://www.stopafib.org/cured.cfm) to learn more. We are in the process of updating that info, but it will be a while before you see the changes reflected.

For those over 80, it's simply on a case-by-case basis with surgeons. They say it's based on the health of the individual patient, with some over 80 being very healthy and others not. It can also be dependant on what Medicare insurance you have, with some plans (often Advantage plans) not paying for those over 75 or 80 to have procedures. 

Mellanie
  • Posted Sat 06 Jan 2018 10:39 AM CST
  • |

Mellanie, 
I just wanted to tell you how much I appreciate your forum.  It is so informative.  Thank you.  I would also like to say that the contributions made by Dr. Bor  Antolic have been most helpful, informative and very appropriate.  As a retired health care provider, I really enjoy his contribution, as I feel his responses provide easily understood explanations for community members.  Thank you,   Donna
  • Posted Thu 07 Dec 2017 09:49 PM CST
  • Comment

Mellaine, iits Ilene, this guy posted on my post about my NSVT. I am really upset. He said he had a normal stress test and echo like I did, insisted to Dr to do an angiogram and he had a widowmaker blockage. They put in a stent. Should I go back my Dr and insist on a angiogram for m?? He thinks I should go to other Dr. Please let me know what you think. I have Anxiety disorder and this has really got it kicked up.Thanks Ileen I asked my doc and he said he did not think I needed one when I saw him about my NSVT episode. 
  • Posted Tue 05 Dec 2017 01:34 PM CST
  • Comment
Ileen,

I'm so sorry that he has upset you. I didn't have a chance to go through all the messages today, so I do now see that yes, he did step over the line into giving medical advice (I believe he is new here and may not understand that that is what he is doing and that it is not allowed), so his final comment is not appropriate. Normally, I'd remove the last sentence of his message, but am concerned about the impact of the whole message on you.

If it were me, I personally would ignore it! We are each unique and what applies to one may not apply to anyone else. And, your doctor knows you and your history, so that is another reason to just ignore him. 

What would be your preference for dealing with this? Should I delete the last line? Should we delete the entire message and explain why? Or do you want to message him privately for more info and ask him to clarify his message (and perhaps why it may not apply to you)? What would be best?

Mellanie
  • Posted Tue 05 Dec 2017 02:02 PM CST
  • |

Hi Mellanie, It has taken me (aussiana) a long time to see your response to my post about Gerolsteiner. I want to thank you for recommending it. I had never thought much about mineral water before. I live  in Western Australia, where men have the highest rate of kidney stones in the world, or so the doctor who extracted mine said, because we dont drink enough water in our hot climate. There is only one distibutor for Gerolsteiner in the whole of Australia and thankfully it is just 5 miles from me! I have just bought another 15 cases. Its in glass thank goodness. I do a lot of travel and find Gerolsteiner hard to find (that is reassuring in some ways as you know it is actually a special product). I take it with me when I play tennis and really find it very useful for afib. The supplier told me that our Prime Minister even orders it! Thank you once again for the tip. Life changing.
  • Posted Sat 25 Nov 2017 11:01 AM CST
  • Comment
Aussiana,

Thanks for the message. That is amazing that the only distributor in such a huge country is that close to you. I'm glad you can buy in quantity, and that it is helping you. That the Prime Minister orders it is really fascinating. Any idea as to why he uses Gerolsteiner?

Mellanie 
  • Posted Sat 25 Nov 2017 12:50 PM CST
  • |

Thanks, Mellanie.  I cannot imagine three weeks on the road. It would take me three weeks to get ready for that!  I hope you have a safe and enjoyable trip.  I don't know how you manage to "wear so many hats"....but I am glad  you do!  Glad to know who jseitz is now.
Have a wonderful Thanksgiving.
Jean
  • Posted Tue 21 Nov 2017 01:25 PM CST
  • Comment
Thanks, Jean. I will stop in at my son's house in Dallas overnight to wash clothes between trips 1 & 2, so that is a little bit of a reprieve. I have a room at his house, and keep shampoo and stuff to refill my containers, and keep makeup there, so it's a lot easier than having to come all the way back out to the farm between trips. And, I have a 2-hour connection at DFW between trips 2 &3. I have gotten used to the pace, but may one day slow down.

Mellanie 
  • Posted Tue 21 Nov 2017 04:00 PM CST
  • |

Mellanie, I am just curious.  Who is JSeitz who makes a lot of posts in the forum as some type of administrator?  I do not recall her being introduced to the group...perhaps I missed that.  I know that Daphne Hughes is the AHA representative...so wasn't sure just who jseitz is.
Thanks...
Jean
  • Posted Mon 20 Nov 2017 02:55 PM CST
  • Comment
Jean,

Sorry. I'm slammed with deadlines before I leave Monday for 3 weeks on the road. 

Here is what Daphne just shared with me:

Jonelle is with Small World Labs. Her role is the same as Kerstin Wiggins, who transitioned to another role this summer. Jonelle has been engaging on the site since August. She introduced herself at that time : https://myafibexperience.org/forums/viewtopic/18/2061?post_id=12920#p12920

Mellanie
  • Posted Tue 21 Nov 2017 12:18 PM CST
  • |

Mellanie, I'm glad to hear that you are back home and all is well with you.  I don't know why Roy has not been posting...haven't heard anything from him.  Perhaps he's had a "bug" like my husband and I have dealt with.  We've had a hard time getting over "whatever" virus it was. We've had our flu shots so it wasn't that. I think Dr. Antolic has good intentions and basically all the comments he has made have seemed appropriate and appreciated by those he has directed them towards. You can read through them and judge what you think.  I know it is unusual to have an EP posting and realize this forum is not meant to give medical advice to its members.  Will you and Daphne be changing the format of the My A-Fib Experience forum? It seems to be working well as is and is easy to navigate.  I am glad you are safely home again in time for the coming holiday.  Wishing you a very happy Thanksgiving!
Best regards, 
Jean
  • Posted Sat 18 Nov 2017 09:44 AM CST
  • Comment
Jean,

Thanks. I did notice that Roy had posted on a thread yesterday, so perhaps he has just been busy. I'm sorry you've had a bug, but I hope ya'll are getting better. I've been watching Dr. Antolic's posts since he joined and so far, they have been helpful and clear. Medical conferences, and even medical schools, are typically conducted in English, so it is the universal language of medicine.

Regarding the change to the forum, I think it will be good. AHA has changed their Support Network forums to another vendor, and ours will go onto that same platform but will retain our look and feel. They are working on it now. I hope to see a mockup or test platform soon.  

Happy Thanksgiving to you as well. I'll be working through Thanksgiving to try to catch up, and probably working on content updates as well.

Best wishes, 
Mellanie
  • Posted Sat 18 Nov 2017 12:51 PM CST
  • |

Hello, Mellanie!  I have noticed that you have not been posting as much as usual in our forum and I hope all is well with  you and your family.  Hopefully, you have just been busy and "snowed under" with conferences and all the the work you do in your position.  I am sure you have noticed a lot of posts and responses in our forum by a physician named Bor Antolic, MD, PhD who is an interventional cardiologist at the University Medical Center in Ljubljana, Slovenia.  When I inquired, he messaged me that he had "stumbled onto" the My A-fib Experience forum and was interested in it. I think he is looking to compare treatments in the U.S. with those in his country.  He has a remarkable command of the English language, although he says he has never studied or resided in an English speaking country...only visited.  I have an idea that he may also be "researching" questions and concerns that a-fibbers have about medicines and procedures in various parts of the world including the costs involved.  At any rate, he has offered some interesting and well educated posts to our group and probably has given some members of our community many good questions to ask their EPs about their medicine and/or treatment.
I notice that we have a lot of new members in the forum, but not all have posted.  I imagine a lot of them are reading the posts and gathering information from them.  I really think this forum helps a lot of people and is a valuable resource.
I have not seen any comments by our new AHA representative, Daphne but I have probably missed some.
Thank you once again for all the effort you have put into "making it happen".  I know there is a lot of work involved.
Warmest regards,
Jean 
  • Posted Fri 17 Nov 2017 04:08 PM CST
  • Comment
Jean,

Thanks for the message. I got back yesterday afternoon from being gone for more than a week on the road, including at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions medical conference. I was able to look through the past week of digests on the plane coming back, but have not been able to reply as I was on conference calls all day. I did notice a lot of posts from Dr. Antolic while I was gone and will be watching over them. Daphne has been trying to work on the new platform that AHA is building for their forums, and was also gone to the AHA Scientific Sessions. I am guessing that she also returned yesterday. I need to catch up on what has been posted, and what I need to comment on. Thanks for reaching out. I didn't notice posts from Roy over the past week - do you know if he is around, too? Thanks.

Mellanie 
  • Posted Fri 17 Nov 2017 08:09 PM CST
  • |

Thanks for the comment
  • Posted Wed 25 Oct 2017 02:11 AM CDT
  • Comment

Mellanie 
Just wanted to share a weird experience I had couple of days back and first in my life. As a premise; I am a retired Army Officer ( Lt Col) who spent an active life all along. Had been a sportsman playing basketball, hockey and many other sports. 
M
Now the incident. I was having an evening walk feeling quite good and energetic so I stepped up and walked at my full capacity for about a mile. To my horror I just broke into an episode of AFib so I dropped my steps into normal pace and came back home about 1/2 miles. It took about one hour to be back into NSR. 
Now my question is that exercise particularly walking is considered good for health/AFib but this incident put me in confusion. I did have a walk thereafter but not at the top pace and felt normal. So how much physical activity can be undertaken by AF sufferers and can you continue on full throttle once under attack?
Your advice is solicited 
Shafiq 
  • Posted Tue 24 Oct 2017 12:29 AM CDT
  • Comment
Shafiq, It is not unusual. For some people, exercise starts their afi, but for others, exercise stops afib. Once you know how it affects you, you can adjust to what is best for you.

Mellanie
  • Posted Tue 24 Oct 2017 09:42 PM CDT
  • |

Mellanie 
Thanks for accepting my friends request. Your knowledge and experience is far advanced and up to date as compared to the people living in my part of the world. Hence, I am sure I can learn and benefit from your expertise pertaining to AFib 
Looking forward to read you soon.
Best Regards
Shafiq 
  • Posted Mon 16 Oct 2017 12:43 PM CDT
  • Comment

Mellanie - I work for the Dept of Defense.  Medical records are government records and not that of the person.  Often times you won't have access to all the records and you must petition to receive copies of your records and treatment.  Those in the DoD have much less "rights" than civilians and our access to medical care is much less. Often what is advertised to the DoD and the reality is very different.  Our care is heavily rationed and generally all aliments result in the same course of treatment - 1000 mg of Motrin.  We in the DoD call that "Vitamin M".

So yesterday I went in to the ER.  Was there for five hours and received a couple of different drugs and treatments.  The record that I received when I departed was a one-page sheet that told me to rest, not smoke and no alcohol.  Nowhere did I receive confirmation of what they found, what drugs I was given, what procedures were done to me, and what the prognosis of my condition is.  I asked and they said it was not available to me.  Interesting.  Had to have the attending ER doc to write down the drug they prescribed to me as it was not in the discharge paperwork. I at least got a small leaflet on the drugs that I got from the pharmacy.    Another point of difference in civilian and DoD, it took over 2 hours for me to be issued my new medication.  That was after the ER discharge.  If I was a civilian, I could have picked it up at CVS or the hospital in minutes.  But a 2 hour wait is about normal for a DoD pharmacy.  
 
  • Posted Sat 14 Oct 2017 06:55 AM CDT
  • Comment
I understand your sensitivity about having the info get out, though with 1.5 million people in the military and 3.0 million working for the federal government, it is rather unlikely that you would be figured out.

"Company" is misleading (alludes to companies like coal mining, offshore oil rigs, etc., where the context is not the same). Thus, those trying to help you have the wrong context to answer from. And, you may find others here who can provide help by knowing what you are really going through. Something as simple as saying you work for the government and are treated at government facilities gives a more accurate context. I understand the environment well because my husband and father were both in the service and were treated through base hospitals (which were usually pretty poorly run).  

The only way to have a truly private place to talk about afib would be a subscription-only model where all members would be vetted by existing members. It's not feasible to do that.

I understand your frustration with the hand you have been dealt. It most likely came from participation in endurance activities, which is the most common cause of afib in younger folks. (Stretching the heart during exertion leads to scar tissue called fibrosis that damages the heart and brings on afib.)

The only recommendations I can make are to read the threads here about magnesium and potassium, and stay hydrated. You might want to read Dr. Mandrola's Haywire Heart book to understand how endurance exercise brings on afib. And, you'll need to avoid endurance exercise for a while in order for the ablation to work. You may eventually need to "detrain" as for many, that is the only solution. It's not ideal, but it is the only way that many have found to manage it.

Good luck.

Mellanie 
  • Posted Sat 14 Oct 2017 05:42 PM CDT
  • |
Melanie - Thanks for the reply.  I am trying to keep my association with the DoD quiet, which is why I used the term “Company”.  One reason is where I currently work that is rather sensitive and I wish to keep my family safe.  Evil abounds on this planet and I do not wish it visited upon my family and home.  I do really sort of work for The Company.  You are right that your rules are far different than mine and I will endeavor to remember that.  On the plus side, there is no financial charges ever, but the negatives of rationed medicine, long wait times and very limited access tip the scales, in my mind, towards the civilian system being better.   Its free, but it is limited and nearly impossible to access many times.

These posts and their replies have really allowed me to deal more effectively with this condition.  This was a severe blow to me.  Just twelve months ago, I competed in a 50 mile trail running race in sub freezing conditions in a remote mountain area to now wheezing through a single mile.  On that race, I finished third in my age group.  I work with some of the fittest and most talented people this country has produced.  They do extraordinary things each day and I am sidelined watching and knowing that was me just a year ago.  It is very hard.  Men derive their sense of purpose from their job and my job is in severe jeopardy because of this condition.  I will probably be medically retired within a year - forced out of my career because of this.  These posts and this board are helping me to deal with that change and reality.

I wish there was a more private board to rant and yell.  I cannot tell you how much this is a blow to me, my career and how I define my place in the world.
  • Posted Sat 14 Oct 2017 05:28 PM CDT
  • |
Spencer,

You said "company", not government/DOD. There is a big difference. The rules that apply to everyone else don't apply to DOD (but would to a company). 

However, it does seem ridiculous that the government can mandate that all records be available to all patients, but then not comply themselves. But, they are in a whole different world and the rules don't apply to them. That explains why you were treated like a piece of meat. That would not likely happen outside the DOD world.  

I'm sorry about what you're going through. Most of us here get our treatment in the commercial world, and therefore our replies to you just may not apply to your world. You may wish to clarify on your post because people are giving you advice that is not relevant to your environment, and then will likely be frustrated when you push back that that doesn't apply in your case without explaining why. 

Mellanie
  • Posted Sat 14 Oct 2017 11:47 AM CDT
  • |

Hi Mellanie.  I must complement you on that extraordinary low rate you got at the Fairmont.  Your negotiating skills were highly successful.  I stayed there many times before and it's a first class hotel. Hope to meet you at next years Afib program.  And thank you for all you do.  Bob


 
  • Posted Thu 05 Oct 2017 06:18 AM CDT
  • Comment
Thanks, Bob, though I have to give credit for the great negotiating to our event planning company, Sage Events. Hope to see you at the next event.

Mellanie
  • Posted Thu 05 Oct 2017 09:07 AM CDT
  • |

thanks mellanie for your info i do appreciate it. i know there are people in this world suffering with far worse things than afib but  at the moment i am realy tormented and worried about the future prospects of having this afib and how its guna affect me as i get older.?  i think its mainly because i dont know anyone close to me who has it who i can talk to. i do know of poeple who have it(not many)  but i dont know them well enough to ask them indepth questions. things like how long have you had it or how long youv been in permanent afib etc etc? and is there any drugs that suppress that horrible fluttering feeling whilst in a permanent state of afib. ? its the thought of that feeling that frightens me you see. i cant even understand how some folk can have afib without knowing it until a E K G  picks it up.???
  • Posted Tue 19 Sep 2017 02:11 PM CDT
  • Comment

hi mellanie, i just wondered wether or not you can shed some light on the progression of afib for me.? i am a 50 year old male, diagnosed with afib 3 years ago but had palps since my early 20s. im currently having night time episodes (vagal.?) maybe once a month. iv had 2 ablations and am now taking warfarin. and 300mg of rythmol daily. i am alot better than i  was but just wondered how long i could stay in a once a month episode state for.? is it common to stay like this for years and years? or is it common to progress further faster.? i would realy appreciate any info you may have.
  • Posted Fri 15 Sep 2017 12:59 PM CDT
  • Comment
Ron,

My personal opinion is that one should do everything possible to get out of afib and certainly not live with longstanding persistent afib. Living with it causes fibrosis (scar tissue) to build up and just about guarantees heart failure and a stroke (unless you are religious in taking your blood thinner, even when you become frail and forgetful). This is just my personal opinion, and not endorsed by AHA or my organization. But, I cannot imagine living with this condition long term.

Mellanie
  • Posted Tue 19 Sep 2017 11:06 AM CDT
  • |
thankyou for your reply mellanie i realy appreciate it. i dont have sleep apnea but i am trying to learn as much as i can about this afib i have, i have a good E P in england but i find there are no definate answers to this condition.?  i think what i am trying get my head around is the thought of living with my heart not been in sinus rythum permanently one day.? and how do people live when like this.? are the majority living a poor quality of life or not.? without sounding depressing i do sometimes feel realy fearfull of the future with my afib. 
  • Posted Sun 17 Sep 2017 02:26 PM CDT
  • |
Afib generally progresses further and faster for most, though there are exceptions. We have no data to show who progresses and who doesn't, so no one can really give you any insight into whether you will progress, or not.

I've been traveling and cannot recall if you have sleep apnea, or not. That can make a big difference in your progression as it causes episodes to come more and more frequently.

Mellanie
  • Posted Fri 15 Sep 2017 01:13 PM CDT
  • |

Hello,

i am wondering if there are any other resources to determine the success rates of individual doctors performing  ablations...besides memberships in the various heart rhythm societies etc. Choosing a doctor without enough information is troubling. I realize the high volume centers maintain their rates are the highest but often there are several doctors in these centers. Additionally the claimed success rate data is usually at least  a year or two old.

Thank you for your answer.
  • Posted Sun 03 Sep 2017 07:51 AM CDT
  • Comment
This is a common question, and the answer is no. It's best to look for an electrophysiologist that is a member of the Heart Rhythm Society and holds the FHRS (Fellow of the Heart Rhythm Society) designation, indicating a high level of skill and expertise: You will find the locator at http://www.hrsonline.org/Find-a-Specialist - check the FHRS checkbox to search for an FHRS.
  • Posted Sun 03 Sep 2017 11:49 AM CDT
  • |

 Could you recommend a link to top ranked cardiologist in my area. I live in Brooklyn,   Ny  Will consider doctors in ny.  I am not comfortable with my present doctor.  Thank you
  • Posted Sun 23 Jul 2017 08:38 PM CDT
  • Comment
Sorry, I didn't get notification of your comment/request and am just now discovering it. Some of the top NY electrophysiologists are Dr. Vivek Reddy at Mt. Sinai and Dr. Larry Chinitz at NYU Langone. Over in the NJ area, there is Dr. Andrea Russo at Cooper Union and Dr. Suneet Mittal at Valley. You can find contact info for all at 
http://www.hrsonline.org/Find-a-Specialist (the Heart Rhythm Society is the EP society).
  • Posted Sun 03 Sep 2017 11:46 AM CDT
  • |

Hi Melanie, Thanks for taking your time to answer all these questions.  You asked me what my chad rate is and it is 2, female and 66. No other major health issues, no high blood pressure or diabeties. But I can't stress more that three drs. nero and EP have told me aspirin at the most because of brain bleed history. Plus the reaction so far to Metropropanyl  and Rythymeral, so at present taking only natural things, yes to magnesium, Hawthorne, Coq10, also started the nattokinease cause Im feeling anxious about meds, but don't know if its helping or not. So Drs talk about minimaze..okay but don't I have to be on anticoagulants for awhile?  Any thoughts, advice, suggestions are very much appreciated ,
Thanks,
cribbed
  • Posted Thu 20 Jul 2017 10:33 AM CDT
  • Comment
For those who are on anticoagulants before a minimaze, they will usually leave you on them for 3 months afterwards. But, if you're not on them already, they may not put you on them. It's worth talking to the surgeon you might consider using to see what they would do in YOUR circumstances because each patient is unique.
 
  • Posted Sat 22 Jul 2017 10:28 AM CDT
  • |

Hi Melanie, 
Thanks for initiating this forum. It will help a lot of Afib patients. Keep up the good work. I read this everyday because I know it will help me a lot. You can have the information you need to know by simply reading it. It helps me a lot. 
  • Posted Wed 19 Jul 2017 08:13 AM CDT
  • Comment
Thanks, Doncar. Glad it helps you.

Mellanie
  • Posted Sat 22 Jul 2017 10:26 AM CDT
  • |

I have A-fib since last year, and find my balance has become really terrible almost unbearable, no doctor seems to know the cause since itès not medical, other then taking 120 mg of proprananol daily for my A-fib now,. I have always taken proprananol but not in this lrge a dose. I also get really bad Raynauds  in my hands and feet, believed to be cause by proprananol.. Anyone else have this problem, sure would like some information and help, My Doctor says use a cane, my friends say get another Doctor., My A-Fibe is paramoxamal, but bad enough.
Wanda
  • Posted Sun 02 Jul 2017 09:01 PM CDT
  • Comment
I am afraid that I don't know what to offer. Would you be willing to post this on the forum as perhaps others can help.

Mellanie
  • Posted Sun 02 Jul 2017 09:08 PM CDT
  • |