Newly Diagnosed with AFib?

Newly Diagnosed

If you or someone close to you has recently been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation (AFib), you probably have a lot of questions or concerns. You might also be feeling so overwhelmed by the diagnosis that you aren’t sure what kinds of questions to ask. You’ve taken the first step toward learning more, and we’re here to help.

Taking a proactive approach to learn more about AFib is the next step. Becoming an informed advocate for yourself or a loved one is the best approach for managing AFib. This community is an educational resource, as well as a place to connect with other people who are managing their AFib or for those helping a loved one who is living with AFib – JOIN NOW!

 

Newly Diagnosed Articles
What is AFib, or Atrial Fibrillation?

Atrial fibrillation (also called AFib or AF) is a quivering or irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications. Some people refer to AF as a quivering heart. An estimated 2.7 million Americans are living with AF.

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Why AFib Matters

What are the consequences of atrial fibrillation (AFib)? Although atrial fibrillation can feel weird and frightening, an “attack of AFib” usually doesn’t have harmful consequences by itself. The real danger is the increased risk for stroke. Even when symptoms are not noticeable, AFib can increase a person’s risks for stroke and related heart problems.

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Understand Your Risk

Are you at risk for atrial fibrillation? (AFib or AF) Any person, ranging from children to adults, can develop atrial fibrillation. Because the likelihood of AFib increases with age and people are living longer today, medical researchers predict the number of AFib cases will rise dramatically over the next few years.

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Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation

The most common symptom: a quivering or fluttering heartbeat Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common type of irregular heartbeat. The abnormal firing of electrical impulses causes the atria (the top chambers in the heart) to quiver (or fibrillate). View an animation of atrial fibrillation.

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Treatment and Prevention

Know your treatment goals The treatment goals of atrial fibrillation (AF or AFib) start with a proper diagnosis through an in-depth examination from a physician. The exam usually includes questions about your history and often an EKG or ECG. Some patients may need a thorough electrophysiology study.

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Newly Diagnosed Resources and FAQs

Newly Diagnosed Resources and FAQs Resources and FAQs - For Patients

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