Treatment and Prevention

Treatment and Prevention


Know your treatment goals


The treatment goals of atrial fibrillation (AF or AFib) start with a proper diagnosis through an in-depth examination from a physician. The exam usually includes questions about your history and often an EKG or ECG. Some patients may need a thorough electrophysiology study.


Prevention and Risk Reduction


Although no one is able to absolutely guarantee that a stroke or a clot can be preventable, there are ways to reduce risks for developing these problems.

After a patient is diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, the ideal goals may include:

  • Restoring the heart to a normal rhythm (called rhythm control)
  • Reducing an overly high heart rate (called rate control)
  • Preventing blood clots (called prevention of thromboembolism such as stroke)
  • Managing risk factors for stroke
  • Preventing additional heart rhythm problems
  • Preventing heart failure


Getting Back on Beat


Avoiding atrial fibrillation and subsequently lowering your stroke risk can be as simple as foregoing your morning cup of coffee. In other words, some AFib cases are only as strong as their underlying cause. If hyperthyroidism is the cause of AFib, treating the thyroid condition may be enough to make AFib go away.

Doctors can use a variety of different medications to help control the heart rate during atrial fibrillation.

"These medications, such as beta blockers and calcium channel blockers, work on the AV node," says Dr. Andrea Russo of University of Pennsylvania Health System. "They slow the heart rate and may help improve symptoms. However, they do not 'cure' the rhythm abnormality, and patients still require medication to prevent strokes while remaining in atrial fibrillation."

Recent Discussions From The Newly Diagnosed Forum
SinusRhythm avatar

Hi.

I've been recently diagnosed with A Fib.  I was diagnosed in December 2017.  Went to the ER and ended up being admitted for 2 nights.  I'm now taking Cardizem 270mg 1 capsule daily.  Also Metoprolol 25mg twice a day and Eliquis 5mg twice a day.  What I've noticed in the past few weeks is that I'm now having shortness of breath along with the flutter.  Actually the shortness of breath seems to be the main symptom now.  I don't feel the flutter as much anymore only the shortness of breath feeling.  My cardiologist told me that my Echo shows no signs of Congestive Heart Failure.  He said that the blood flow looked good and my heart was strong.  I have a sleep study appt coming up.  I've been told about the antirhythmic meds and will consider that after I have the sleep study.  I'm also overweight and in the process of diet and exercise.  56 years old.  The doctor told me that I apparently have the gene that was passed down to me from my dad that gave me A Fib.  My question is with my shortness of breath.  I'm wondering why I now have shortness of breath at least once a day which lasts maybe 1-2 hours.  Could this be the meds? (I'm thinking it's not the meds since I've been on them since December and no shortness of breath until recently).  Could it be that blood is now backing up into my pulmonary vein causes it?  If so would a chest xray determine that?  I also can lay down at any time of day and fall sound asleep for 2-3 hours.   I'm feeling some anxiety wondering about it.  I have an upcoming appt with my doctor but thought I would put this out to the community in the meantime.  Also let me say this... When there is no shortness of breath and no flutter happening I wouldn't even know I have this disease since at those times I feel fine.


Thank you      

whackyshoe avatar

I recently had a Holter Monitor test, and was informed that there were 10 abnormal beats in the 24 hour period, and was subsequently diagnosed with AFib and put on blood thinners.  This was shocking to me.  I didn't know how to react.  And now I'm curious about, and cannot find any information on why one 10-beat "episode" is considered AFib.  We are going to repeat the test again in 1 month.  I'm guessing the blood thinners (Pradaxa) is just a precautionary exercise at this point in time.  I'm a 67 female, exercise regularly (Zone 2 most days, Zone 1 for 90 minutes every day), and work at a high stress desk job (software engineer) every day.  I am overweight (BMI 32).  I don't have any other chronic conditions (yet).  I have been following the DASH guidelines, and have started following Dean Ornish rules for the past 10 weeks (it's hard!!!).  I do not have high blood pressure (126/62).  Can someone confirm that 10 beats falls within the realm of an AFib diagnosis?

MrsZee avatar

I am just wondering if anyone knows this:  what is Metaprolol actually do?  Is it for heart rhythm control or heart rate control or both? 

My doctor only mentioned that it would slow my heart rate so I am not certain what else it does?

Thanks everyone,

Terri

 

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