Treatment with Medications

Treatment with Medications


Understanding Your Medication


Medications are often prescribed to reduce risks for blood clots that can lead to stroke. Additional drugs may be prescribed to control heart rate and rhythm in the AFibpatient. These medications may also be used in conjunction with other treatments. You can benefit from learning what to expect from the medications that are prescribed for you.

Know Your Treatment Goals


Know your treatment and medication goals, possible options, and how to reduce your risk. Learn more about the goals.

What Are The Treatment Guidelines for Atrial Fibrillation?


Medical guidelines are written by a panel of experts to document the science that helps healthcare providers choose the right treatments. Here’s a simplified version of the atrial fibrillation guidelines, which were written by a panel of experts who reviewed the science guiding treatment decisions for AFib patients.

Understanding AFib Medications And Why They Are Helpful


Atrial Fibrillation Medications may include blood thinners, heart rate controlling medications, and heart rhythm controlling medications.

The Importance of Medication Adherence


If you have been prescribed heart medications, taking and tracking your medications is one of the best things you can do for your health.

Newer Oral Anticoagulant Medications


In recent years, some new medications, called “non-VKA* (or new or novel) oral anticoagulant” (NOAC) medications have been made available by prescription and have been shown to effectively reduce the risk of stroke caused by atrial fibrillation.

Your Medication Questions Answered


We collected questions from our community and brought the most-asked questions to some of our nation’s leading atrial fibrillation thought leaders.

Recent Discussions From The Providers Office Forum
Wayne avatar

I am a 78-year old male with persistent AFIB for about the last 20 years with only occasional instances of racing heart rate.  In 2010, I had open heart surgery to replace the aortic valve along with a triple by-pass and a cryo-maze procedure to correct the AFIB (the maze procedure only fixed the AFIB for about a month).  In my opinion, I have been doing very well and see my personal physician and cardiologist twice a year.  I keep a good record of my vitals on a weekly basis.  Every so often (2 to 3 times a year) I note that my heart rate (normally 68-70 BPM) while sleeping will dive to the 40's and 50's and stay at that lower rate for a week or two.  Neither of my doctors seem concerned about this.  During my discussion last week with my cardiologist, while discussing this issue, he stated that AFIB can result in low heart rates as well as high heart rates and talked about a pacemaker if and when the low heart rate situation warrants it.  I did not know that AFIB could cause low heart rates and would like to hear if others on this forum have expeienced low heart rates as a result of AFIB.  Thanks.

Trish avatar

Still sifting through the reams of info on ablation. Seems no real consensus on anything except that the centers that do the most have the best outcomes. Saw my lovely, warm dr yesterday for consult on ablation...when or if to do. He is outstanding and I was ready to pull the trigger on the procedure when he told me that since he is at a teaching hospital, his students(fellows) do the ablation with his oversight and correction when needed. I should have realized this but did not. So...the centers that do lots of ablations without student participation narrows the field considerably and let's out some of the major players. Please share any experiences. I am ready and will to travel but would prefer Miami/NYC area. Also, anyone out there have ablation at a teaching hospital?

Trish

Deb M avatar

I am going into the hospital next Wednesday for "tikosyn load". My doctor's office is not very forthcoming with information. Can anyone tell me what to expect? How is the load done and monitored? Is the load constant through IV or only at particular times? Do you have to actually lay in a bed for 3 days or can you get up and move around? Can you shower? What should you take to the hospital with you? Were you able to have visitors? How long before you can resume normal activies when you return home? Has being on this medication changed your life style?I would appreciate any advice anyone has. Thank you.

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