Engaging with Healthcare Providers

Engaging with Healthcare Providers


One of your most important relationships is with your doctor and your healthcare team. A good relationship involves listening as well as asking the right questions, and asking again if you don’t get the answers you need. You should look for a provider who is not only well-qualified to treat your AFib, but also someone with whom you feel you can build a cooperative partnership.

You will be most likely to get a satisfying outcome when you are able to clearly understand your treatment goals and your healthcare provider can get clarity on your day-to-day experience with your AFib.

Work With Your Healthcare Team


Improving Your Partnership

Here are some ways AFib patients can improve communication and partnership with doctors and their healthcare team. Most doctors respect a patient’s investment in learning more about his or her condition, and many physicians will be naturally inclined to help educate patients who are receptive and engaged. Learn how you can communicate your willingness to be a partner in reaching your treatment goals.

Questions to Ask Your Doctor


Discover some good questions to ask your doctor about options for your AFib treatment. You’ll also learn what you can do to be fully prepared for your visit.

Partnering with the Surgeon or Electrophysiologist


If you are considering AFib procedures, here are some questions to ask the doctor about having a procedure.

Recent Discussions From The Providers Office Forum
Spencer avatar

OK.  Now, I didn't do it not to say that I didn't think it... but my cardiac doc broke his should.  Remember this doc - yelled at me when asking about other options, performed a cardioversion on me after I told him that I didn't approve one, and cooed about how intelligent and talented he was after my last ablation and then I had a heart attack 3 days later.  Well - he is out.  My ablation was moved from 4 Apr to 5 Apr and I have a new doc.  But, I will not be allowed to meet with this doc until I am on the OR table. I tried to get some info but since this is all military, there is zero records online.  The doc could have multiple malpractice claims against him, or have terrible success with ablations.  I don't know.  I only know that he is a doc and that is about it.  

So I will be operated on for cardiac surgery by someone that I don't know and won't meet until the moment before I am put under.  I have gotten worse from every single operation in this clinic and my symtpoms have gone from annoyance to debilitating and life threathening.  I can't back out as my VA benefits could be denied because I am not doing what is being perscribed.  So I's @@#$@ again.  Par for the course.

Spencer

Waiting for my Sunrise

Blkat131 avatar

Hello all,


I was recently diagnosed with afib/rvr, and my doctor ordered a pocket ecg for one month. I am not taking any drugs for this condition, as I could not tolerate them, not because I didn't want to. Anyhow the cardiologist office just called and gave me an appointment on Tuesday due to an alert they received overnight from my monitor, but did not tell me what it was specifically. Does anyone here have experience with these monitors or know why an alert would be generated?  I had a short spike in hr up to about 130 which quickly resolved, and later woke in the middle of the night with my heart thumping like crazy, not high rate but very irregular. Now of course Im even more anxious than I was, waiting for a call back from a nurse. Thanks for any insights.

 

cowlady1 avatar

I am interested in knowing how many of you are seeing an EP rather than a cardiologist...I have been in SNR since my diagnosis in early November.  Cardiologist never put me on a monitor and I found him to be dismissive and distracted.  If episodes were caused by holiday heart syndrome (which are his thoughts) does this mean I will be on drugs forever? 

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